the Grand Cataclysm

The Grand Cataclysm refers to a collection of seismological events that began with widespread earthquakes and tremors and ended with the massive, six-month long eruption of Krakatoa that led to the creation of the Krakatoa Massif.

Beginning in March of 1883, earthquakes of a severity never known began to strike throughout the globe. At first, these quakes effected areas known to be unstable, but by May 1883, areas that had never known seismic instability were wracked by massive quake and sever tremors and after-shocks. Some earthquakes were so severe that entire cities and towns disappeared, believed to have been swallowed whole by the earth. One example of this was Peshawar, which disappeared after a massive earthquake that stretched along the entire Iranian plateau from 18 to 21 April 1883.

It is believed that the Grand Cataclysm led to the eruption of the volcanos on the island of Krakatoa. Reporting indicates that there was almost no place on the globe that did not register the sound of an explosion on 16 June 1883, which is believed to be the initial eruption. No eyewitnesses exist, as the blast radius encompassed most of the Dutch East Indies. Tidal waves battered most of the South Pacific for the next three months as eruptions continued, and ash covered the sky globally. Eruptions only subsided in December 1883, and on 20 December, an expedition from the Dutch government identified the newly created Krakatoa Massif, a mountain range stretching 200 km and linking the remains of Sumatra and Java. The range is crowned by Tharsis Mons, which is now the highest peak on the Earth, official recognized as being 10 km in height.

the Grand Cataclysm

Ocean Earth FraserRonald FraserRonald